Race in America Videos & Responses

Leave your comments to the videos below. How do could the race dynamics in the study apply to the U.S. Latino population?

25 Responses to Race in America Videos & Responses

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  2. salvarez says:

    Some incredible writing here everyone. These videos give a pretty strong argument for a “science” experiment about race. How scientific is this study really? Could the children be acting in any way? Wouldn’t the cameras affect the way they acted on camera? Also, is this supposed to be a pyschological study or a sociological/anthropological one? Or is it prime-time journalism, complete with corporate sponsors?

    Either way, I think the main line of writing I’m reading from everyone. I’m reading some theories of domination, as racism is a social relation of domination between groups and for categories of thought, which in some ways structure this reality we live through. Much is made of parental responsibility and media access to kids. How much TV to let children watch, and what programs? As Samuel says, also video games . . . And as a few mentioned, books, from some canonical stuff, to children’s lit, to certain texts written from the minority “ethnic” perspective (as in this class). Certain representations of African Americans, then, pass on certain arguments about stereotypes, or exaggerations of group identity. The same for Hispanics, and Asians. The configurations change depending on the group, similar theories of social relations from marginalized groups to the US mainstream hold water for all of them. The same could equally apply to marginalized groups not focused on race, but perhaps on gender, psychology, or social class.

    Something interesting with the cases when the black/white divide crosses lines, and cases when some of the children fell outside the “science” of the study. Looking at the exceptions, or the data against the grain, is also a good thing to look at when trying to figure out how an academic article makes its presentation and analysis. For example, the young woman who said her teachers didn’t look at children at their skin color, but what they had on the inside. Focusing on cases like that calls for less attention to the “science” of this study, but more on the actual voice of someone on a sort of personal level and not as a statistic.

    Some more questions: What roles to schools have in all this? Several of you all spoke about parents, but what about schools? Having Black teachers, for example. Or going to a school with students from a variety of backgrounds, as opposed to a more racially homogenous one . . .

  3. mchan says:

    In the video, we see that there tends to be a white bias for both black and white children when questions regarding positive traits are asked. They pick the pictures of the children with lighter skin tones as the ones who possess qualities such as “smarter, “prettier,” more desirable, and while some of these opinions are influenced by parents, a lot of it also has to do with reinforcement by media and personal experiences. Some of those children may have encountered particular traits with particular groups of people and then gone on to use that as a blanket statement for the rest of that group–essentially stereotyping them all based on a few experiences. Furthermore, a lot of these “values” are reinforced by media portrayals rather than challenged. This is telling for how other races are portrayed in American media and can be applied to US Latino populations. One of the parents mentioned that when we read articles or see news clips on poor performance in schools, black children are usually shown–and not only that, but now increasing so are images of children of Latino heritage. This same treatment of Latino children or Latinos would invariably have the same effect we see in how children view “non-whites.” The issue is how these kids are absorbing these messages and what kinds of messages they are. Most are disparaging or insulting (intentionally or unintentionally) and portrayals of white people are usually positive and beneficial. A reason why this may be is because of the poverty in black and latino communities and to an even greater extent, the high visibility of the problems within these communities. (Poverty leads to a host of other problems and is a systemic issue that engenders many others). Because of the visibility and expectations, these groups become linked to certain traits or images.

  4. Suzette says:

    I believe kids at an early age see differences in skin color. I believe they learn from the adults in their lives and are exposed to stereotypical messages in television carton programs, the media and even story books. From these, they form impression on skin color. I am not surprised that the study questions received biased answers from the interviewed kids. They naturally identify the color of their own skin with positive attributes, while the other skin color received negative attributes. However, the bias towards whites remains to this day, part of the American culture. Although these kids do not fully understand the exact meaning of race, they identify of their own skin color, that of others and then form opinions. Some of these kids seem too young to be given the “race talk” but I firmly believe that at some point in the lives of American children, it should be addressed. I breathed a sigh of relief that a few kids had unbiased responses to the study questions. This shows they might have had the “race talk” or be informed enough to place the color of everyone’s skin on the same level. This study reminds me of “Shades of the Border.” There is conflict between the two countries because the issue of race exist. Haitians are looked down upon by the Dominicans because of their black skin color. Dominicans feel that they are of a higher rank or class. The conflict is also of a social issue because the children of the Dominican Republic was raised to hate the Haitians.

  5. Czareena Dotchev says:

    The irony of how the media is to blame regarding children’s predominantly racists views of different individuals and how we need to watch a report about it on television for it to manifest itself as a societal problem is not something surprising. Children are constantly bombarded with images and concepts from their households and the outside world. Even in the situations where parents think they are teaching their children about diversity the message is not getting through that media is a business constantly attempting to make a profit. Because we still acknowledge race as something real rather than a creation of society based on a pseudo science that has long been rejected race still haunts our society. It appears that it is profitable to juxtapose dark individuals as blemishes on a white society by focusing on the negatives that few individuals in proportion to the size of the community engage in. It was interesting that the discussion turned from how races are compartmentalized based on the stereotypes that are perpetuated in the media and across generations to the economic aspect of the barriers that prevent certain individuals from progressing and having the means to educate their children in a way that does not expose children to a racial bias.

  6. I think that the race dynamics in the videos apply to the U.S. Latino population because they weren’t mentioned often. They were blended into the studies only insofar as the study creators needed a color scale. They were mentioned once in all five videos and were mentioned as having lower economic backgrounds. However, while these studies were only focused on two races, they speak to the effects of parents’ bias being passed to the current generations. The parents, who had to watch their children exhibit blatantly racist selections looked embarrassed, mortified. The dialogue between parents has been closed off or one sided. Either “we don’t see race in this family, everybody is the same” or the parents speak not thinking that their children will hear and retain this information and mimic it as the opportunity presents itself. They fact that Latin@s were not brought into this study I think was a good thing; adding another layer to the already confused world of childhood race associations would have proved even more shocking, I am sure.

  7. lblomsand says:

    The Doll Test: Then and Now
    Prejudice is all around us and this is shown clearly in both the 1950’s Doll Test as well as the more recently conducted test by Anderson Cooper’s team. All the reasons given for the continuation of prejudice in our country are valid; lack of exposure to other races, family values, media bias as well as the concentration of poverty and these must all be addressed for a holistic healing of our society greatest problem. Color bias isn’t just a black/white issue but an issue of gradation as seen by the use of the skin-color chart in conjunction with the Doll Test for the older children. In the video “A Girl Like Me” it is obvious that there is a bias against the darkest skin tones even within the black community. There are clear stratifications within our society that foster a culture of prejudice due to both the concentration of poverty and life cycles of poor education found in all areas of the country. The media is so blatantly biased that it a slap in the face to anyone of color. Yet Americans have been formulating their world view based upon a media so skewed towards the whitest of America for so long that an indoctrination of false values is complete by the time children reach school age – a time when they could form opinions based on real experiences. Parents make decisions on how much exposure their children will have to a racially biased media but choices are also made about exposure to other races by deciding where a family lives as well as the family’s attitudes towards race in general. If choose a myopic vision of the world for yourself and your family then there can be very little chance for your children to see the world clearly. Very few people are color-blind and why should we expect, or even want, them to be? When people are judged by the content of their characters instead of the hue of their skin then a shift in societal norms can take place. The girl who selected all the dolls as good and whose father talked about having a dialogue with her about character had the optimal outlook forged within a society predisposed to prejudice and its continually biased media input. This percept applies to all races and colors with our society – including Latin@ – because without shifting focus from the external to the internal no progress will ever be made.

  8. sally says:

    The videos definitely revealed shocking results being that America today should be a country where race is not a big problem. America is a “melting pot” where cultures mix and race is not an issue today as it was in history. However, that is not the case as seen in the videos above. Some children see the white and black races as divided between “good” and “bad” people. This can be due to, as the “Home Influence on Kids and Race” video says, the environment they are raised in or how their family teaches them about it or what they see on TV. This shows that it is very important to teach children at a young age that color does not matter and what matters is how people are on the inside as how some kids answered in the experiment questions.

    This relates to the U.S. Latino population because in one of the readings we had called “The Konk” by Piri Thomas, he talked about how he saw other cultures who were not considered “white” made themselves to look as “white” as possible by getting their hair straightened and trying to make their skin color look as white as possible through creams and bleach. If they were not considered “white”, then they will feel as if others will not accept them into society. This goes back to the videos above where the children answering the experimental questions pointed to the darker doll as “bad” because it was not as “light” as the other dolls.

  9. rkhan826 says:

    I must say that out of all these videos, the ones that involved the adults rather than the ones with the children, got a bigger reaction out of me. Even one mother admitted that her son may have picked up these attitudes towards race from her because she herself has been raised in a “very” white community and had prejudices of her own. Without a doubt, children mainly pick up things from their parents more then they pick up things from secondary sources such as media, and it is evident that parents are hesitant to say they are in any way responsible for their childrens perception of color. These experiments were conducted to determine if children were color blind and if they are bias at an early age and they concluded that “bias towards white is still very much part of our culture”, and I don’t think that will change.

  10. salix says:

    Unfortuntlly these videos demonstrate the reality of what is going on with how people view different races and how it reflects upon the children. Its sad to see that children are catagorizing color to whether it is good or bad, it makes us wonder how is it that they were able to come up with this conclusion. I agree with what Michel said about “the problem lies not with the child, but with parental “broughtupcy”, the media and the economy”. I also believe that it all has to do with how the child is bought up and the financial situtation that they are in, and also what they watch on the television. With music for instance we can say that a rappers music video is going to be completly different then a country singers video and a lot of the rappers videos contain a lot of violence and they say a lot of bad words which can lead a child to think that black is bad and white is good because their music has a lot to do with love and friendships in order words “good” things. I think this reflects a lot on the Latino community as well because it can cause a lot of confusion to a child if they are light skin hispanic or dark skin hispanics, why do they or any race be catergorized as “good or “bad” by the color of their skin and not by their actions. It makes me upset that this is still going on now with the new generation when the days of racism was left behind us and we are now a more open and liberal country.

  11. Kristen C. says:

    I think that this study that was done is very eye opening about the undertones of racial inequality in our society. The fact that the black children thought that they were any less beautiful, smart or good based on the color of their skin is a sad thing. This shows that race is still an issue in our country, and it is not something that people want to acknowledge. I think that the study can relate to the inequaliy that Latinos face because it showed that both the white children and black children thought that the white skin color was more appealing. This might tie over into other cultures, such as Latinos. It is really an unfortunate thing to learn that children are picking this sort of thing up, in a society that prides itself in being underatanding and accepting to other cultures. The fact that the white mother said that she never spoke to her daughter about race, while the black man’s daughter had, is also revealing. This shows the way that white people are less aware or concerned about the issues. If it does not affect them, they are less likely to talk to their children about the topic. Since it may have been an issue for the black family, the man ingrained the idea in his daughter that she was beautiful no matter what.

  12. icaban says:

    The children’s responses in the “Race in America” videos didn’t surprise me, but they were saddening to me. It is one thing to know racial stereotypes still exist and it’s a whole other thing to hear them coming out of a five year old who is capable of picking up on these prejudices without having any life experiences to base them upon. They simply draw these conclusions from their environment. The video that was heartbreaking for me to watch was the video where the bold African-American girl points to her own skin and declares in front of Anderson Cooper that black skin is “nasty.” This little girl is already growing up with the idea that she isn’t beautiful because of her skin color. She doesn’t only identify “blackness” with ugliness, but identifies herself as ugly as well.The little girl is proof that it isn’t only white children who are prejudice against people of a darker skin color; children of darker skintones are discriminatory towards their people and themselves. These videos reminded me of Colon’s piece “The Mother, the Young Daughter, Myself, and All of Us” where the child uses the n-word in public while referring to a darker-skinned individual who she doesn’t want to sit next to. In that story, the child is a direct reflection of the unspoken racial prejudices still present in her society. These videos also made me think of a story I read in my American Literature 2 class last semester titled “The Wife of His Youth” by Charles W. Chessnut. Similar to our society, the society the story takes place in values lighter skin over darker skin. The protagonist of the story embodies this “skintone value system.” He is “colored,” but he looks more white than black; he even belongs to an exclusive society that concists of “light-skinned” black people. When he is on the verge of asking a “light-skinned” mulatto woman to marry him, the protagonist is faced with a wife he married back when he was a slave. The wife he aquired while he was a slave is unremarkable in appearence; she is dark-skinned and deemed as less attractive than the mulatto girl the protagonist has his heart set on marrying. When faced with his first wife, the main character doesn’t want to be associated with her because of her “blackness.” Eventually he redeems himself by introducing her as “the wife of his youth” in front of a group of his closest and “lightest” friends, but Chessnut’s story shows that even “lighter” individuals of a particular race are prejudice against “darker” individuals of the same race. Like amark916’s response mentioned, this “color” issue isn’t only present in the black community, but the Latino community as well. I’m puertorican, but I am very white in skintone and so are my parents and my brother. However, when I am out with my grandparents (my mom’s parents) who are darker than me (they have a mocha color to their skin) in my neighborhood that is predominantly Italian/Polish, they sometimes get disapproving looks. I remember there was a situation at my apartment building where one of my neighbors (neighbors who have always been pleasant towards me) didn’t let my grandfather into the building because they didn’t trust he was a member of my family because we didn’t “look” alike. But I knew my neighbor wasn’t talking about a physical resemblance; she was referring to our difference in skin tone. I feel guilty at times because my “whiteness” gives me a pass in society; I haven’t and probably will never have to face the discrimination my grandparents, at times, have to put up with. But unfortunately, prejudices/stereotypes don’t change overnight; it is what it is.

  13. catherine says:

    These video’s reminded me of the other video we watched in class, “A girl like me” because it was conducted in a similar fashion. Much like the video watched in class, these videos conducted a study to see if kids are “colorblind” in America by showing them pictures of white, tan, and black children and asking questions like, “which one’s the bad child” and “which one’s the smart child”. What surprised me is that even black children seemed to have a bias towards white children, almost like they were made to think that white children are superior. It’s really depressing when I see news coverage like this because often times people don’t realize how severe a situation is until it’s plastered all over the news, but it may be too late to even change the children’s minds. It was uplifting seeing one of the last video’s because it showed a young black girl answering the same questions as her peers, but her answers included, “it doesn’t matter what you look like on the outside, it only matters what you look like on the inside.” This gave me hope for kids that all isn’t lost in today’s generation.

  14. Michel says:

    The Anderson Cooper’s video demonstrated two profound findings within America. The influence of the media and the economic fuel stereotypes and covertly shaped americans and the world at large, their attitudes towards race. Since a child is not born with an awareness of race or its stereotypes; it can only mean that children receive these perceptions at home and from the public society. Hence, the problem lies not with the child, but with parental “broughtupcy”, the media and the economy. One of the speakers made a profound statement that the media shaped the coverage within the new room which results in bias attitude. She stated that certain race receives a brighter spotlight within negative situations while another race receives the same spotlight, but within more positive circumstances. This results in the child internalizing and developing bias towards a particular race. The last speaker made a recommended statement that race should be discuss as oppose to sweeping it beneath the carpet because people do see color whether they admit it or not. At this point, such discussion falls into a highly overdue category as racial issues overtly and covertly take precedence presently in America.

  15. monikaszegda says:

    These CNN videos “Race in America” show a deep problem embedded in American culture which is that kids are taught to racially stereotype from a young age. The mind of a child is like a sponge, absorbing every detail presented to them. It is painfully comical to watch the white girl’s mom reaction to her daughter answering the questions because it is obvious that the child picked up the negative stereotypes through reinforcement and exposure to such negative views, presumably from those who surround her at home and school. In opposition to the video “A Girl Like Me”, the CNN videos show a more promising and positive reaction from both a few black and white children. In contrast to the “A Girl Like Me” video one of the girl’s embraces her black skin color in these videos. The father of one of the black girls in the video is proud when is daughter ignores race and claims “It’s the inside that counts”. This too however can be problematic and is known as the phenomenon of “color blindness” which states that “we are all the same” therefore inherently ignoring that the problem of racism is very real and apparent. These race dynamics can be applied to the Latino community as well. If Latino children are constantly reinforced into thinking that “whiteness” is good and that anything other than that is viewed negatively, this has a horrific impact on self esteem and self motivation.

  16. Ali Troiano says:

    When I first started watching the first video (Inside the AC360 doll study), what struck me the most were the reasons the children gave for their responses. Without the reasons, “ because he is black” or “because he is brown,” one could argue that the white children simply pick the darker figures because it is different from their skin color (similar to how the young white girl pointed to the lighter child as the “good” child because “she looks like me”) Meaning, the white children would pick any child, weather the other child were red or purple etc…, that is not white like themselves. There are obvious social constructions on race that drive the 76% of the white children to choose the two darkest skin tone when prompted to “show me the dumb child.” However, this notion is undercut because even the black children hold this “white bias.” Also, even if it were true that the children simply favor those who look like themselves, the extreme cases of those kinds of ideas are what cause these racial stereotypes to begin in the first place.

    It is interesting to see the shocked mother explain that she can’t understand why her daughter looked down at the darker figures because she explains they never talked about race in that way. The black father (whose daughter chooses racially neutral answers) explains that he instills these beliefs in the child, unlike the white mother who simply never addressed it. This response implies that race should be something parents talk about with their children, especially in order to undercut stereotypes that are perpetuate throughout society.

    The 5th and 6th video points out that the results of these tests do not imply that parents teach the children this “white bias.” However, society constructs and perpetuates these stereotypes in children. The last video advises parents to simply inform their children of the other side or the narratives that are not being told in order to prevent these types of one-sided perspectives on a certain group of people. This reminded me of depiction of Latino’s in American culture. We began the semester discussing our Latino Anthology and Latino’s writer’s relation to literary canon. The notion of “minor literature” is indirectly addressed in this last video and how this “minor literature” could, indeed, stop the perpetuation of the stereotypes that we see in the media and other societal constructs.

  17. mlcancemi says:

    Maria Cancemi
    These videos relate to the race dynamics in the video “ Immersion”. In the video “ Immersion” the student is a Latino and the classroom contains majority white children and it’s the white children that make fun of the Latino student as not being smart because he can’t speak English. Then the Latino student has a friend that looses faith in him-self and wants to skip the state test to get ice cream. The Latino student that did stay to take the test reminds me of the black girl that stated all teachers wouldn’t care what color the student is. The Latino student that left to get ice cream reminded me of the younger black girl that pointed to her own skin color as being the “bad” or “mean child”. The reason behind her pick was because she thinks her skin color is “nasty”. These two students from both videos translate that racism occurs today and the most wanted color promotes white complexion as intelligence, kindness, and goodness. It’s interesting to see that in both videos that there was a student that chose their own color for the negative qualities and spoke with little confidence behind their picking for the dark color. However, the black children were highly confident behind picking the white color. Meanwhile, the white children spoke arrogantly in this video about their explanation of their pick. For example a white student said the reason why she picked the black child was because “she’s black black”. Similar to the “Immersion” film the white boy was laughing and teasing the Latino student for just saying the answer to the math problem and not the explanation. I feel that the study applies to the U.S. Latino population because their skin tones are dark and due to that they are the minority. Both videos explain how through media the majority is white people and white is always portrayed as the smartest or the nicest and black people are portrayed as criminals. Both videos express how adults should take action to mold their own children’s mind. That it’s the adult that should intervene and teach the truth. In “Immersion” it was the teacher that expressed her emotions towards this unjustified statewide test. In the videos for today it was the parents and interviewer position to address the truth. The media is to blame and the adults are the ones who should fix the message to the children. But, isn’t the adults the ones who produce the media? Therefore, that’s why in both videos they strictly specified adults as the teacher and the parents to make a change.

  18. mlcancemi says:

    Maria Cancemi

    These videos relate to the race dynamics in the video “ Immersion”. In the video “ Immersion” the student is a Latino and the classroom contains majority white children and it’s the white children that make fun of the Latino student as not being smart because he can’t speak English. Then the Latino student has a friend that looses faith in him-self and wants to skip the state test to get ice cream. The Latino student that did stay to take the test reminds me of the black girl that stated all teachers wouldn’t care what color the student is. The Latino student that left to get ice cream reminded me of the younger black girl that pointed to her own skin color as being the “bad” or “mean child”. The reason behind her pick was because she thinks her skin color is “nasty”. These two students from both videos translate that racism occurs today and the most wanted color promotes white complexion as intelligence, kindness, and goodness. It’s interesting to see that in both videos that there was a student that chose their own color for the negative qualities and spoke with little confidence behind their picking for the dark color. However, the black children were highly confident behind picking the white color. Meanwhile, the white children spoke arrogantly in this video about their explanation of their pick. For example a white student said the reason why she picked the black child was because “she’s black black”. Similar to the “Immersion” film the white boy was laughing and teasing the Latino student for just saying the answer to the math problem and not the explanation. I feel that the study applies to the U.S. Latino population because their skin tones are dark and due to that they are the minority. Both videos explain how through media the majority is white people and white is always portrayed as the smartest or the nicest and black people are portrayed as criminals. Both videos express how adults should take action to mold their own children’s mind. That it’s the adult that should intervene and teach the truth. In “Immersion” it was the teacher that expressed her emotions towards this unjustified statewide test. In the videos for today it was the parents and interviewer position to address the truth. The media is to blame and the adults are the ones who should fix the message to the children. But, isn’t the adults the ones who produce the media? Therefore, that’s why in both videos they strictly specified adults as the teacher and the parents to make a change.

  19. nadiab says:

    The CNN special “Race in America” identifies the issues of stereotypes in American society and the ways in which young children determine which skin color is “better”. Interestingly, even after many years the root of stereotypes start from quick judgments based on a person’s physical appearances such as the color of their skin. Often, these stereotypes pass down many generations later that they become an important topic to discuss, especially when individuals have preconceived notions on the various types of skin colors that are most appealing to society. As such, the CNN study on race is relevant to Latino studies. In the U.S, Latinos encounter racial stereotypes. The conflict occurring between the United States-Mexico border contributes to the stereotype of illegal aliens as mostly being Mexicans. Not only is the color of skin the issue, but the overall assumption on what a Mexican is defined by in regards to their physical appearances and job occupations adds to the growing animosity towards Latinos in the United States. Within the Latino community, there are racial prejudices against individuals of a certain color as well. Latinos with dark skin are looked down upon by Latinos with lighter skin. Darker skin is not seen as appealing as the lighter skin. Though both the dark and light individuals are Latino, the darker person is seen as the “other” and does not fit the ideal representation of a Latino through the eyes of the lighter person. Such stereotypes also pass down to the children in the Latino community as well. Hence, the physical appearances, like skin color, become the ruling factor in determining which color of skin is suitable to society’s ideals within and outside of the Latino community. Videos such as “Race in America” leave viewers questioning how much society has progressed from the years in which a person’s race, such as Latino, determined an individual’s place and acceptance into American society.

  20. wshuaib says:

    (cont.)
    In addition, the video that demonstrated the hate that Haitians have with the Dominicans is the same issue that relates to race. These countries are similar in so many ways and because one race is darker then the other they choose not to accept one another. These videos as well as the others just exemplify our problems in society. One chooses to not accept another because of race and chooses to think he is better than the other. Having this bias attitude affects the Latinos who have darker skin. If they are trying to get a job in this bias society it will be hard for them to get it and even harder for them to achieve this American Dream.

  21. wshuaib says:

    These videos reminded me of the video we saw in class that was titled “A Girl like me”. These videos show the bias attitude society has constructed towards dark skin people. In a “A Girl like Me’” and in “Black or white: Kids on Race” we get to see how the little children would rather play or prefer the white doll or picture as oppose to the darker skin one. These ideas of beauty are constructed by society, media and everything else that is around us. The Latinos are no stranger to this bias attitude as through our readings and videos we have seen this. Latinos range from dark skin to light skin and the people that got this darker skin are faced with discrimination. Often the whites are considered with positive things as oppose the blacks. There are so many stereotypes that are affiliated with dark skin that one can see the effects it has on little children.

  22. Samuel A. Batista says:

    I do agree with what the message the videos are conveying, that the children very early on between the ages of 5-10, show biased opinions/stereotypes due to the types of media and ideas they are exposed to each day. The pilot experiment reminded of yes the “Girl Like me” video because it shows between then and now not much is truly changing. Only after age 10 as thy say above do the kids really begin to filter for themselves what is truly evil or truly good, not on color of skin but what is on the inside. It is truly sad that what is mainly shown to the children are stereotypes from all aspects from cartoons, to tv shows even video games dictate stereotypes but people just move on as if nothing ever happened. I do recall a cfew years ago, a game called “Resident Evil 5”, a game on bio-terrorism, simple sci-fi, was targeted for being racist and classifying a large stereotype that eventually it was almost completely blocked from production. The protagonist was a white man placed in Africa, killing these bio-organic experimental humans, who were black. However, the company reached out in a full apology but they did not intend it to be portrayed as such but it was an art form, a game that showed a sci-fi world and nothing more. I am a gamer I do admit, and seeing what the plans when the game was first revealed I knew would eventually lead it to the predicament it was in. Games are just one example that stereotypes are built in, whether or not it is the intention it no longer matters, to portray a story or not, the way society has been working around this whole idea is a bit of a disappointment. Going back to one of the reaction videos, particularly the mother, I wasn’t too sure what she meant when she said “well they did not ask her…” was she defending her daughter’s choice, justifying it, or questioning it, I am uncertain. I found that the father’s reaction to his daughter’s choice, about it does not matter what color one is but what is on the inside that counts, is the closest thing to not classifying others into stereotypes and it is only a very small percentage who actually carry this kind of knowledge with them. Since some already know this knowledge of what counts on the inside, they know that most likely love is no different, love has no race, you can’t help who you fall in love with no? When the panel of parents were asked about their reactions, it is true what most said, especially the first gentleman who stated that the TV shows seen showing a police officer arresting someone, 9/10 usually the one being arrested is a black person and to combat this social media is not something that can be won easily because simply networks won’t change their source material because they receive great ratings so they really couldn’t care less. I am curious to know however, to make this experiment more interesting, why not add various ethnic groups since we are in the “Melting Pot” of the world allegedly, lets put an Asian boy and girl in this experiment, also lets also put a Latino boy and girl from both age groups and see if their results are any different. This does not surprise me with the current results and as stated prior it is a shame but it is one of the many things that must combated in order to help make an actual “Equal” future for all of us.

  23. The video series brings out the conflict of stereotypes directed towards the different races in society. Racism is something that has come about and many groups face racism in America over time. In the video we see the idea of racism directed toward the white and black populations, in this case white is considered the “good” or “liked” race whereas black is the “bad” or “not liked” race. The children had associated white with being “smart” and “pretty” and black as being “dumb” and “ugly”. I found it interesting how only one or two of the children that were interviewed picked all the skin tones as being equal and didn’t think race mattered stating that it was about who the person was as whole not about the color of their skin that mattered. I thought the mother’s reaction was interesting to see because it shows how parents need to talk to their children more about the topic of race so that they are aware of the idea. The mother reacted by crying because she was surprised at her daughter’s response and this showed how the child only associated those pictures that appeared to look the same as she did. I also found it interesting how the African American young girl responded stating how “race doesn’t matter and that either skin tone looks good.” The most interesting part of the video I believed to be the interview with all the parents of the children. The parents are a huge influence on what their children believe along with the media. For instance, one parents brought up the idea of watching television shows that have criminals in them and usually the criminals are of darker skin tones directing the stereotype that darker is considered with being “bad”. The parents also stated how not only the media influences the children’s thoughts on race but also the type of neighborhood they live in and how open their families are to talk about race because the children need to be aware of race being it is something that will surround them in everyday life. Children need to be open to race and understand that not everyone they encounter in life will look the same as them and that there are “good” and “bad” in every race. These videos are related to the Latino race in some way, in the case of Haiti vs. Dominican Republic. These two groups are very close to each other and yet they are discriminated against with many stereotypes just because they vary from very light skin to very dark skin.

  24. dlpirraglia says:

    The videos above reminded me a lot of the situation in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Although these two neighboring nations share an island with limited resources, there is considerable racism against the darker skinned Haitians. The fact of the matter is that race and skin tone is a social issue that crosses cultures. Lighter skin is often revered, as seen in the videos where the positive traits were attributed to the whiter toned drawings and the negative ones to the darker shades. Although it is a well knows issue in most societies, the subconscious racism that resided in many of these young children was certainly surprising to see. When they asked parents’ how they reacted to their children’s responses, my surprise seemed echoed. Although these parent’s never explicitly discussed race with their kids, they no doubt picked up opinions from their society. If anyone is to learn anything from is experiment it is that each and every child is a sponge. If we want to create a better society, one in which race dynamics are less tumultuous, we should start by instilling the idea of equality in children.

  25. amark916 says:

    The videos above can be compared to the Latino community because it is the same dynamic. In the videos I observed the white and black children associate positive attributes with white skin and negative with dark skin. In the Latino community, because Latinos come in all shades and colors the lighter or whiter the skin is positively labeled as beauty or bright. Let’s take Brazil for instance, the Afro-Brazilian population struggles with racism. They deal with social conflicts, such as lack of education and low paying jobs. They are Latino, but because of their skin color they are viewed as “less than” and do not have equal access to resources as the European Latinos have. Skin color and race are used to place people in categories, just as the children categorized the animated pictures. The majority associated black/brown with negative connotations, while the lighter skin was associated with positive. It does not surprise me to see this because the media and society conveys this to our youth. While the majority of white children leaned towards the stereotypes associated with dark skin, it was nice to observe more black children who have a sense of pride about themselves and the color of their skin. Latinos have struggled with race issues just as much as blacks. It does not matter who has dealt with racism more or less. The issue here is the prevalence. Why is there a hierarchy where color is concerned?

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